Entries from July 2012 ↓

Jul 31, ‘The Tall Man’ Gets VOD Release Tomorrow

The Tall ManIn what seems to be a common release pattern you will be able to see The Tall Man almost a month before the films theatrical release.  The Tall Man comes to VOD starting August 1st

Jul 31, Chicagoan? Planning on Having a Flashback Weekend? We’ve Got Some Wild News!

Flashback WeekendFor those of you in the Chicago area planning on visiting the 10th annual Flashback Weekend Chicago Horror Convention, we've got a cool bit of news that comes our way via Flashback's event coordinators. If you're one to seek out the remarkably rare, this is some 411 you'll not only want, but need.

Jul 31, New Outpost II Trailer Kicks Major Zombie Ass

Outpost 2I can't lie, I never got around to checking out Steve Barker's Outpost, but after getting a look at the brand new trailer for the follow up (which has been sitting in limbo for some time now), Outpost II: Black Sun, I can guarantee I'll be seeking this one out immediately: The sequel looks absolutely vicious!

Jul 31, Outrageous Excision Hits DVD and Blu-ray This October

ExcisionIf you haven't seen the trailer (definitely not safe for work) for Excision, now is the time to tune in, because it's going to stir an interest in you in a major, major way: this flick looks unnervingly grotesque, and I'm not in the slightest bit appalled to announce my personal craving for the film.

Jul 31, Second Teaser Trailer for Paranormal Activity 4 Stumbles in

Paranormal Activity 4 TrailerThis morning we received the second teaser trailer for Paranormal Activity 4.  The full trailer will be released tomorrow.  So if you are ready for another 13 seconds from the trailer click the play button below.

The Dark Knight Rises


It's hard to get into without divulging spoilers, but I can say that The Dark Knight Rises is a fitting conclusion to the trilogy. As a guy who likes to write stories about ordinary people thrown into far-out situations, I admire Nolan's ability to take the fantastical and keep it grounded enough to connect with the average moviegoer. Too often we get summer blockbusters that are all sound and fury, yet signifying nothing -- I'm looking at you Michael Bay.  

After the deaths of Harvey Dent and Rachel Dawes, Bruce Wayne/Batman (Christian Bale) has been in seclusion for the last eight years. But now a terrorist called Bane (Tom Hardy) has set his sights on Gotham. Can The Batman return to form and take on his most dangerous adversary yet?

Clearly, this is the most ambitious story in the trilogy. Everything is bigger this time around, stakes and obstacles. Bane is more than Batman's equal, physically and intellectually. The consequences of past actions comes back to haunt Gotham City in a big way. This is an old fashioned crime thriller played out on an epic scale -- with a protagonist who likes to dress up like a six-foot bat. Nolan tosses in some ripped-from-the-headlines elements to make the story even more relatable.


With all that said, this is not a perfect film. In fact, there are more things to pick at than the previous films combined. Characters make choices that seem illogical or a case of lazy storytelling just to reach certain plot points, which is highly uncharacteristic of a Chris Nolan film. The ending itself isn't forced, but the script feels like it needed a few more passes. Some critics have argued the film should have been split in two, in order to flesh things out -- not the worse idea I've ever heard...



It would have been impossible to duplicate Heath Ledger's Oscar winning performance as the Joker. Thankfully, Tom Hardy doesn't try to go there. Bane is his own uniquely scary entity. And while I had some reservations about the casting of Anne Hathaway, she gives a solid turn as Selina Kyle. Marion Cotillard also gives a memorable turn as Miranda Tate. I've made the argument in the past that female characters have had little to do in Nolan's Dark Knight universe, but this isn't the case here.

All in all, I guess I'm trying to say The Dark Knight Rises is a good film with some great parts, but not on the level of Batman Begins or The Dark Knight. It'll be interesting to see how it holds up 2-3 years from now. I found an outstanding interview with Nolan about The Dark Knight Rises on a recent podcast of The Treatment. It's only around 30 minutes long, but gives tremendous insightt into his process. In fact, I liked it so much that I rounded up links to other Treatment episodes with Nolan on Batman Begins and The Dark Knight.

The Dark Knight Rises


It's hard to get into without divulging spoilers, but I can say that The Dark Knight Rises is a fitting conclusion to the trilogy. As a guy who likes to write stories about ordinary people thrown into far-out situations, I admire Nolan's ability to take the fantastical and keep it grounded enough to connect with the average moviegoer. Too often we get summer blockbusters that are all sound and fury, yet signifying nothing -- I'm looking at you Michael Bay.  

After the deaths of Harvey Dent and Rachel Dawes, Bruce Wayne/Batman (Christian Bale) has been in seclusion for the last eight years. But now a terrorist called Bane (Tom Hardy) has set his sights on Gotham. Can The Batman return to form and take on his most dangerous adversary yet?

Clearly, this is the most ambitious story in the trilogy. Everything is bigger this time around, stakes and obstacles. Bane is more than Batman's equal, physically and intellectually. The consequences of past actions comes back to haunt Gotham City in a big way. This is an old fashioned crime thriller played out on an epic scale -- with a protagonist who likes to dress up like a six-foot bat. Nolan tosses in some ripped-from-the-headlines elements to make the story even more relatable.


With all that said, this is not a perfect film. In fact, there are more things to pick at than the previous films combined. Characters make choices that seem illogical or a case of lazy storytelling just to reach certain plot points, which is highly uncharacteristic of a Chris Nolan film. The ending itself isn't forced, but the script feels like it needed a few more passes. Some critics have argued the film should have been split in two, in order to flesh things out -- not the worse idea I've ever heard...



It would have been impossible to duplicate Heath Ledger's Oscar winning performance as the Joker. Thankfully, Tom Hardy doesn't try to go there. Bane is his own uniquely scary entity. And while I had some reservations about the casting of Anne Hathaway, she gives a solid turn as Selina Kyle. Marion Cotillard also gives a memorable turn as Miranda Tate. I've made the argument in the past that female characters have had little to do in Nolan's Dark Knight universe, but this isn't the case here.

All in all, I guess I'm trying to say The Dark Knight Rises is a good film with some great parts, but not on the level of Batman Begins or The Dark Knight. It'll be interesting to see how it holds up 2-3 years from now. I found an outstanding interview with Nolan about The Dark Knight Rises on a recent podcast of The Treatment. It's only around 30 minutes long, but gives tremendous insightt into his process. In fact, I liked it so much that I rounded up links to other Treatment episodes with Nolan on Batman Begins and The Dark Knight.

The Dark Knight Rises


It's hard to get into without divulging spoilers, but I can say that The Dark Knight Rises is a fitting conclusion to the trilogy. As a guy who likes to write stories about ordinary people thrown into far-out situations, I admire Nolan's ability to take the fantastical and keep it grounded enough to connect with the average moviegoer. Too often we get summer blockbusters that are all sound and fury, yet signifying nothing -- I'm looking at you Michael Bay.  

After the deaths of Harvey Dent and Rachel Dawes, Bruce Wayne/Batman (Christian Bale) has been in seclusion for the last eight years. But now a terrorist called Bane (Tom Hardy) has set his sights on Gotham. Can The Batman return to form and take on his most dangerous adversary yet?

Clearly, this is the most ambitious story in the trilogy. Everything is bigger this time around, stakes and obstacles. Bane is more than Batman's equal, physically and intellectually. The consequences of past actions comes back to haunt Gotham City in a big way. This is an old fashioned crime thriller played out on an epic scale -- with a protagonist who likes to dress up like a six-foot bat. Nolan tosses in some ripped-from-the-headlines elements to make the story even more relatable.


With all that said, this is not a perfect film. In fact, there are more things to pick at than the previous films combined. Characters make choices that seem illogical or a case of lazy storytelling just to reach certain plot points, which is highly uncharacteristic of a Chris Nolan film. The ending itself isn't forced, but the script feels like it needed a few more passes. Some critics have argued the film should have been split in two, in order to flesh things out -- not the worse idea I've ever heard...



It would have been impossible to duplicate Heath Ledger's Oscar winning performance as the Joker. Thankfully, Tom Hardy doesn't try to go there. Bane is his own uniquely scary entity. And while I had some reservations about the casting of Anne Hathaway, she gives a solid turn as Selina Kyle. Marion Cotillard also gives a memorable turn as Miranda Tate. I've made the argument in the past that female characters have had little to do in Nolan's Dark Knight universe, but this isn't the case here.

All in all, I guess I'm trying to say The Dark Knight Rises is a good film with some great parts, but not on the level of Batman Begins or The Dark Knight. It'll be interesting to see how it holds up 2-3 years from now. I found an outstanding interview with Nolan about The Dark Knight Rises on a recent podcast of The Treatment. It's only around 30 minutes long, but gives tremendous insightt into his process. In fact, I liked it so much that I rounded up links to other Treatment episodes with Nolan on Batman Begins and The Dark Knight.

The Dark Knight Rises


It's hard to get into without divulging spoilers, but I can say that The Dark Knight Rises is a fitting conclusion to the trilogy. As a guy who likes to write stories about ordinary people thrown into far-out situations, I admire Nolan's ability to take the fantastical and keep it grounded enough to connect with the average moviegoer. Too often we get summer blockbusters that are all sound and fury, yet signifying nothing -- I'm looking at you Michael Bay.  

After the deaths of Harvey Dent and Rachel Dawes, Bruce Wayne/Batman (Christian Bale) has been in seclusion for the last eight years. But now a terrorist called Bane (Tom Hardy) has set his sights on Gotham. Can The Batman return to form and take on his most dangerous adversary yet?

Clearly, this is the most ambitious story in the trilogy. Everything is bigger this time around, stakes and obstacles. Bane is more than Batman's equal, physically and intellectually. The consequences of past actions comes back to haunt Gotham City in a big way. This is an old fashioned crime thriller played out on an epic scale -- with a protagonist who likes to dress up like a six-foot bat. Nolan tosses in some ripped-from-the-headlines elements to make the story even more relatable.


With all that said, this is not a perfect film. In fact, there are more things to pick at than the previous films combined. Characters make choices that seem illogical or a case of lazy storytelling just to reach certain plot points, which is highly uncharacteristic of a Chris Nolan film. The ending itself isn't forced, but the script feels like it needed a few more passes. Some critics have argued the film should have been split in two, in order to flesh things out -- not the worse idea I've ever heard...



It would have been impossible to duplicate Heath Ledger's Oscar winning performance as the Joker. Thankfully, Tom Hardy doesn't try to go there. Bane is his own uniquely scary entity. And while I had some reservations about the casting of Anne Hathaway, she gives a solid turn as Selina Kyle. Marion Cotillard also gives a memorable turn as Miranda Tate. I've made the argument in the past that female characters have had little to do in Nolan's Dark Knight universe, but this isn't the case here.

All in all, I guess I'm trying to say The Dark Knight Rises is a good film with some great parts, but not on the level of Batman Begins or The Dark Knight. It'll be interesting to see how it holds up 2-3 years from now. I found an outstanding interview with Nolan about The Dark Knight Rises on a recent podcast of The Treatment. It's only around 30 minutes long, but gives tremendous insightt into his process. In fact, I liked it so much that I rounded up links to other Treatment episodes with Nolan on Batman Begins and The Dark Knight.

Public Domain Online Text: The Story of a Disappearance and an Appearandce by M. R. James

The letters which I now publish were sent to me recently by a person who knows me to be interested in ghost stories. There is no doubt about their authenticity...

Query Like A Boss!

I came across a handy add-on for Gmail (via lifehacker) called Right Inbox. It allows you to schedule e-mails to be sent at a specific time, which is cool in itself, but the more interesting feature is the ability to track e-mails. The majority of our query letters will go unanswered, but now you can determine if someone is actually reading them. I sent out a few and it worked like a charm. While the service is $4.95 a month for unlimited e-mails, there's also a free version limited to 10 e-mails monthly.

Query Like A Boss!

I came across a handy add-on for Gmail (via lifehacker) called Right Inbox. It allows you to schedule e-mails to be sent at a specific time, which is cool in itself, but the more interesting feature is the ability to track e-mails. The majority of our query letters will go unanswered, but now you can determine if someone is actually reading them. I sent out a few and it worked like a charm. While the service is $4.95 a month for unlimited e-mails, there's also a free version limited to 10 e-mails monthly.

Query Like A Boss!

I came across a handy add-on for Gmail (via lifehacker) called Right Inbox. It allows you to schedule e-mails to be sent at a specific time, which is cool in itself, but the more interesting feature is the ability to track e-mails. The majority of our query letters will go unanswered, but now you can determine if someone is actually reading them. I sent out a few and it worked like a charm. While the service is $4.95 a month for unlimited e-mails, there's also a free version limited to 10 e-mails monthly.

Query Like A Boss!

I came across a handy add-on for Gmail (via lifehacker) called Right Inbox. It allows you to schedule e-mails to be sent at a specific time, which is cool in itself, but the more interesting feature is the ability to track e-mails. The majority of our query letters will go unanswered, but now you can determine if someone is actually reading them. I sent out a few and it worked like a charm. While the service is $4.95 a month for unlimited e-mails, there's also a free version limited to 10 e-mails monthly.

Query Like A Boss!

I came across a handy add-on for Gmail (via lifehacker) called Right Inbox. It allows you to schedule e-mails to be sent at a specific time, which is cool in itself, but the more interesting feature is the ability to track e-mails. The majority of our query letters will go unanswered, but now you can determine if someone is actually reading them. I sent out a few and it worked like a charm. While the service is $4.95 a month for unlimited e-mails, there's also a free version limited to 10 e-mails monthly.