Entries Tagged 'horror without people' ↓

Horror Without People: GOODNIGHT MOMMY

Although I'd rank Goodnight Mommy amongst the best horror films of 2015, I'm still sussing out my thoughts and feelings about it. Damn that last 20 minutes or so–damn them I say! Unpleasant, they were, but not in a "Hey moron, this is a horror movie, don't get upset that you're uncomfortable" way, but rather in a "Oh, this is where we're going?" way. Nearly everything that preceded the third act was so intriguing that when things took a particularly nasty turn into Modern Horror Movie™ territory, it killed my boner a bit.

Regardless of that or my other minor quibbles, however, I was–and remain–enamored with the feel of it. It's very much about whatever good or evil lurks under the everyday façade; obviously this is the entirety of the film's "Is this bandaged woman our mommy or not?" premise but the theme goes further than that, seeping into nearly every deliciously uncanny frame. This beautiful family in a beautiful house nestled amongst beautiful fields and waters–why does it all come across so creepy? What are they all hiding, what are they really thinking, what the hell is going on? The abnormal looks normal approach is nothing new, particularly in horror cinema ("Within, walls continued upright, bricks met neatly, floors were firm, and doors were sensibly shut..."), but that doesn't mean I'm not gonna eat up fine filmmaking when I see it, you know?














Horror Without People: GOODNIGHT MOMMY

Although I'd rank Goodnight Mommy amongst the best horror films of 2015, I'm still sussing out my thoughts and feelings about it. Damn that last 20 minutes or so–damn them I say! Unpleasant, they were, but not in a "Hey moron, this is a horror movie, don't get upset that you're uncomfortable" way, but rather in a "Oh, this is where we're going?" way. Nearly everything that preceded the third act was so intriguing that when things took a particularly nasty turn into Modern Horror Movie™ territory, it killed my boner a bit.

Regardless of that or my other minor quibbles, however, I was–and remain–enamored with the feel of it. It's very much about whatever good or evil lurks under the everyday façade; obviously this is the entirety of the film's "Is this bandaged woman our mommy or not?" premise but the theme goes further than that, seeping into nearly every deliciously uncanny frame. This beautiful family in a beautiful house nestled amongst beautiful fields and waters–why does it all come across so creepy? What are they all hiding, what are they really thinking, what the hell is going on? The abnormal looks normal approach is nothing new, particularly in horror cinema ("Within, walls continued upright, bricks met neatly, floors were firm, and doors were sensibly shut..."), but that doesn't mean I'm not gonna eat up fine filmmaking when I see it, you know?